Tom’s Garden

Growing by the Bay

Tag: citrus

Limequat, a New Addition to the Citrus Collection

Limequat
Limequat.

One pleasure of gardening in the San Francisco Bay Area is the ability to grow citrus. While we don’t get the heat that produces the bountiful harvests of Southern California groves, we do have mild enough winters that we can grow many types of citrus and get a decent harvest from them (where I am anyway, maybe not in the sun- and heat-starved city). And citrus trees usually do well in containers, which provides great flexibility.

The latest addition is a Eustis Limequat (Citrofortunella japonica, I guess, though there seems to be a lack of consensus about the plant’s botanical name). As the plant’s common name suggests, this is a hybrid of kumquat and lime, specifically Key (Mexican) lime. It typically grows to about six to eight feet. The hybrid was created by Walter Swingle in Florida in 1909, and Florida remains the main area of its popularity. But the tree should be grown more widely, because from its kumquat parent it inherits greater cold tolerance that most limes. According to Gardening Know How, “It can usually survive temperatures as low as 22 F. (-6 C.), and it can sometimes survive as cold as 10 F. (-12 C.).”

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Citrus infusions

Citrus infusions

These are a few of the infusions I’m preparing to be used in a new citrus amaro. I like the different colors. Left to right: Eureka Lemon, Satsuma Orange, Bearss Lime.

These are just infusing in vodka, so they will take a little longer than if I were using grain alcohol.

All of the citrus I use is from my garden and has not been treated with any pesticides or other nasties.

South-facing wall. Front l-r: <em>Artemisia absinthium</em> (wormwood), <em>Calendrinia spectabilis</em>. Back l-r: White Genoa Fig, Persian Lime.

South-facing wall. Front l-r: Artemisia absinthium (wormwood), Calendrinia spectabilis. Back l-r: White Genoa Fig, Persian Lime.

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