Tom’s Garden

Growing by the Bay

Category: fruit

Limequat, a New Addition to the Citrus Collection

Limequat
Limequat.

One pleasure of gardening in the San Francisco Bay Area is the ability to grow citrus. While we don’t get the heat that produces the bountiful harvests of Southern California groves, we do have mild enough winters that we can grow many types of citrus and get a decent harvest from them (where I am anyway, maybe not in the sun- and heat-starved city). And citrus trees usually do well in containers, which provides great flexibility.

The latest addition is a Eustis Limequat (Citrofortunella japonica, I guess, though there seems to be a lack of consensus about the plant’s botanical name). As the plant’s common name suggests, this is a hybrid of kumquat and lime, specifically Key (Mexican) lime. It typically grows to about six to eight feet. The hybrid was created by Walter Swingle in Florida in 1909, and Florida remains the main area of its popularity. But the tree should be grown more widely, because from its kumquat parent it inherits greater cold tolerance that most limes. According to Gardening Know How, “It can usually survive temperatures as low as 22 F. (-6 C.), and it can sometimes survive as cold as 10 F. (-12 C.).”

Read More

Red-flowering Currant

Red-Flowering Currant

Red-flowering Current

The genus Ribes includes currants and gooseberries (the name is derived from a Farsi word meaning “acid-tasting”). Gooseberries bear thorns but currants are thornless. Gooseberry fruits are larger and sweeter, and more often eaten raw (though birds favor the small berries of currants).

Ribes sanguineum, Red-Flowering or Pink-Flowering Currant, is native to the Western US. It produces pendant flowers that are beloved by hummers, in late winter or early spring. This one began flowering in our garden around Groundhog’s Day, that is, the cross-quarter known as Imbolc in the druidic calendar, which is the beginning of our spring here in the Bay Area. The flowers are long lasting, hanging on through our dry summer. Small blue berries appear in the fall, to the delight of birds.

I think we purchased this plant from Watershed nursery in Richmond last spring. It is now about five feet tall in a large container. In the ground it would probably get to be six to ten feet. It seems to like part sun rather than full, and is said to produce fruit even in nearly full shade. It is drought tolerant once established.

Ribes sanguineum has a bushier shape than Golden Currant, Ribes aureum, which is almost vinelike and in our garden seems happy against a fence. The red-flowering variety is also more deciduous, although this one never went fully deciduous. But the new leaves are glossier and greener, while last year’s leaves are more mottled and tend toward yellow. In some situations the plant will produce excellent fall color as the leaves turn. The leaves are fragrant.

This is a great habitat plant for Bay Area gardens, and a real beauty besides.

Citrus infusions

Citrus infusions

These are a few of the infusions I’m preparing to be used in a new citrus amaro. I like the different colors. Left to right: Eureka Lemon, Satsuma Orange, Bearss Lime.

These are just infusing in vodka, so they will take a little longer than if I were using grain alcohol.

All of the citrus I use is from my garden and has not been treated with any pesticides or other nasties.

Pomegranate Flower

Pomegrante Flower

This is the pomegranates’ second summer here. They are growing in large containers. I think they were two years old when I purchased them. Now at last they are getting the large red flowers that presage fruit.

broken lemon branch

Lost two fairly big lemon tree branches to excessive fruit weight. Should have thinned them out, but this has never happened before, so I wasn’t concerned.

lemons

What should I do with all these lemons?

Fallen persimmon leaves.

The exquisite colors of persimmons

Fallen persimmon leaves.

Fallen persimmon leaves.

Even the fallen leaves are superb.

persimmons

Persimmon harvest

Harvested persimmons.

Harvested persimmons.

Generous persimmon harvest again this year. All from one tree.

I could get a couple more bins like these, but I think I have enough! Got to leave some for the squirrels and birds, right?

Persimmon-laden branch.

Persimmon-laden branch.

lemon

Lemons

lemons

We inherited the lemon tree from a previous resident. We’ve been here for decades and have never bought a lemon since moving in.

plum

Plum blossoms

plum

Here in the SF Bay area, our seasons occur on the cross-quarters. The equinox is more mid-spring than the beginning of spring. Our spring starts with the cross-quarter: Candlemas, Groundhog’s Day, Lunar New Year, Imbolc, whatever you want to call it. Where I live, plum blossoms and quinces announce the change in the season.

What actually inspired me to take this photo was the golden morning light on the grasses behind my library buildings.

persimmons

November persimmons

persimmon

I like the fall color of the persimmon.

I left several persimmons on the round table under the umbrella to the right of the tree. I came home to find six — S I X ! ! ! — deer all in a circle around the table contentedly chewing on persimmons.

When I went out to shoo them away they gave me an aggrieved look. And then they all grabbed a persimmon to take with them as they ran away.

Some rights reserved 2019 Tom’s Garden. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons (attribution, noncommercial, no derivs: 3.0) License (US), although some of the work this blog incorporates may be separately licensed. Text and images by Thomas Christensen unless otherwise noted. For print permissions or other inquiries please request via rightreading.com/contact.htm.