Tom’s Garden

Growing by the Bay

Author: xensen (Page 1 of 19)

Golden Gate Bridge with rocks and waves - detail

Happy 80th Birthday, Golden Gate Bridge

Buddhist monks perform a ritual at the Golden Gate Bridge

Tibetan Buddhist monks perform a ritual at the Golden Gate Bridge.

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A few photos from through the years.

Gruss an Aachen rose flower detail.

Grüss an Aachen Rose, again

Gruss an Aachen rose flowers.

Grüss an Aachen rose flowers.

The  Grüss an Aachen rose certainly loved our wet winter. This is just a photo post. For info about this rose, see this earlier post.

 

 

Garden, 7 May 2017.

Bloomiferous

This is one of the best times of year here for flowers in the garden.

Brugmansia 'Charles 'Grimaldi'

Brugmansia ‘Charles Grimaldi’

Brugmansia 'Charles 'Grimaldi'

Brugmansia ‘Charles ‘Grimaldi’.

Not everything in the garden has to be obscure. ‘Charles Grimaldi’ is one of the most widely available cultivars of Brugmansia for a reason. It’s fragrant, attractive, and reliable. Today I enjoyed playing with photography of some of its large, trumpet-shaped flowers.

 

Brugmansia 'Charles 'Grimaldi'

Brugmansia ‘Charles ‘Grimaldi’.

Mine is growing at the property line under oak and plum trees, as well as bottlebrush and other shrubs. This is an area that gets some morning sun but it is protected from the hottest and most intense sunlight. Under these circumstances the plant has grown tall, maybe twelve feet or more. I give it occasional water during our dry summer season, but not a lot, since it seems to manage pretty well on its own — though the flowers (which are about a foot tall) will wilt a bit in hot, dry weather (but generally recover in the evening, when the fragrance is greatest). It flowers pretty much continuously, year round in my location.

Annie points out that the “huge, recurved & strongly reflexed trumpets start out soft yellow in color & age to gold.” She advises underplanting with blue hydrangea. (I’m not that big on hydrangeas, and I am trying to establish sacred datura under mine.) San Marcos Growers give some history of the cultivar, explaining that it “was named after the late Charles Grimaldi, a California landscape designer, by famed plant breeder Bartley Schwarz (1950 -2004), who operated Highland Tropicals nursery in Half Moon Bay.”

But the name Grimaldi makes me think of the 19th-century British clown Joseph Grimaldi, from whom circus clowns got the name “Joey.” Like Joe Grimaldi the plant is an uninhibited performer, and a  sure crowd pleaser.

Brugmansia 'Charles 'Grimaldi'

Brugmansia ‘Charles ‘Grimaldi’.

Neap Tide cocktail detail showing color.

Neap Tide (cocktail)

The Neap Tide, a refreshing cocktail.

The Neap Tide, a refreshing cocktail.

Today’s fluid delight is something I’m calling a Neap Tide. Neap tides are when the difference between high and low is the least. Steady as she goes. (And this is similar to something Laird’s calls a Tidal Wave.)*

INGREDIENTS
1.5 oz. Laird’s Applejack
0.5 oz. Campari or Bruto Americano
4.0 oz. Orange juice

Stir with ice and strain. You can add an orange garnish. The result is a refreshing drink, with a flavor the evokes grapefruit, that it would probably be all too easy to overdo.

I’m temporarily out of Bruto Americano, so I used Campari, but the Bruto would, I’m sure, be great. As long as you like that kind of thing (as I do) — if bitter isn’t your taste, you could try substituting Apertol, which is sweeter and more citrusy. Hey, they love it in the Veneto and the Alto Adige. If, on the other hand, the OJ is too sweet for your palate, rebalance it with the Campari, or add something like Old Tom’s Aromatic Bitters.


A Tidal Wave is a combination of 1.5 oz. Applejack, 4 oz. OJ, and a splash of cranberry juice.

Detail of Grüss an Aachen Rose flower.

Grüss an Aachen Rose update

Grüss an Aachen Rose flower.

Grüss an Aachen Rose flower.

I’ve talked about Grüss an Aachen roses before. I don’t grow a lot of roses, but I like this one. The problem with modern roses is that they were bred strictly for flowers, and the plant and its foliage lack the nice bush form of old-fashioned roses. But after our wet winter this year, the Grüss an Aachen looks fine. It is blooming profusely, and I couldn’t be happier about it.

 

calandrinia spectabilis

Calandrinia spectabilis

Calandrinia spectabilis flower.

Calandrinia spectabilis flower.

Calandrinia spectabilis — the rare plant with no real common name (though some commercial growers are trying to brand it as Rock Purslane) — is native to the deserts of Chile. In does very well in our area. For one thing, it needs virtually no water. After five years of drought that’s a big plus, even if this last year set records for wetness. I mean, it doesn’t just manage for a while without water, it outright laughs at drought.  So it’s a great plant to put in that corner that the garden hose is hard to get to.

I got mine at Annie’s Annuals. Usually in these posts I do a thorough review of online information and resources (see, for example, here, here, and here). But in this case, Annie’s blurb really says it all:

This spectacular Chilean perennial gets my highest recommendation as the best, super EASY, everblooming, deer-resistantplant for a dry garden or difficult spot. Blooming from May to forever (mine was still in full bloom at the end of November), this most robust succulent produces a continuous supply of hundreds of bouncy, bright cerise, 1.5,” single, rose-like flowers –without deadheading! Color coordinating, attractive, blue-green foliage spreads quickly into a dense, 15” x 4’ groundcover, suppressing all weeds as it grows. Do give it a home in that parking strip that looks so sad, (it’s kid proof!) that blah hillside or anywhere you’d love to see continuous easy color. Cut back to 6” in Winter & add a bit of compost in Spring for perfect appearance next season. Decent drainage. Drought tolerant!

Okay, here are some more links:

Calandrinia spectabilis.

Calandrinia spectabilis. This young plant already needs uppotting, but right now I don’t want to set back the blooms.

Detail of illustration of salad greens from Johnny's catalogue.

Browsing the seed catalogues: Johnny’s Selected Seeds

Johnny’s Selected Seeds, Maine, 7.75 x 10.25 in., 244 pp.

Cover of catalogue from Johnny’s Selected Seeds, Maine, 7.75 x 10.25 in., 244 pp.

Next up on our tour of seed catalogues is my favorite of all, Johnny’s Selected Seeds. Johnny’s, based in Winslow, Maine, is a large operation that was started in 1973 in New Hampshire by a 22-year-old named Rob Johnston. Back then it was briefly called Johnny Apple Seeds, but that name had already been taken. Now employee owned, Johnny’s is a member of the Safe Seed Initiative, pledging that it will not knowingly buy or sell genetically engineered seeds or plants.

One thing I love about this catalogue is the wealth of information in it. It’s better than many most of the gardening books I’ve got from the library. Growing guides are provided for many varieties of vegetable. Second, extraordinary comparison images show differences among varieties. And, finally, the photography is excellent. All three features can be seen in this excerpt from the bush beans section:

Johnnys Selected Seeds, excerpt from section on bush beans.

Johnnys Selected Seeds, excerpt from section on bush beans.

Sometimes the images comparisons can be amazingly extensive. Just check out this section on microgreens, which required three separate scans (sorry I didn’t get a better result):

Johnny's Selected Seeds, microgreens comparison.

Johnny’s Selected Seeds, microgreens comparison.

Or this page on salad greens:

Johnny's Selected Seeds, salad greens comparison.

Johnny’s Selected Seeds, salad greens comparison.

These are addictive. Here are varieties of radicchio:

Johnny's Selected Seeds, radicchio varieties comparison.

Johnny’s Selected Seeds, radicchio varieties comparison.

It’s hard to stop.

Johnny's Selected Seeds, beets.

Johnny’s Selected Seeds, beets.

So this is an extensive (244 pp.), oversized, full-color catalogue that is fun and educational. Now, I should say that Johnny’s seems more oriented to market gardens than home gardens. Still, it does offer seed packets in home garden quantities. While the prices of the seeds are reasonable, I was disappointed by the shipping costs, which are higher than many other vendors on the level that is likely to work for the individual gardener. No matter. It’s still my favorite seed catalogue.

A new look for Tom’s Garden

I’ve changed the look of this blog (but not the content very much). Mainly what you will see now is larger images. (The typography and sidebar configuration is also changed.) I think this makes sense because much of the content here is photographic. Previously I used a distinct homepage with small square thumbnails linking to the posts. Let me know if you have any thoughts about the new look. Here’s what the homepage used to look like:

The look of the former home page of this blog (using a modified child of the apostrophe theme).

The look of the former home page of this blog (using a modified child of the Apostrophe theme).

jasmine

Jasmine

Star jasmine.

Star jasmine.

I’ve been traveling and haven’t posted much here for a little while. So here’s some Star Jasmine to tide us over.

Geums.

The Prodigal Gardener

The garden, April 9, 2017

Returned to the Bay Area after a while away. I was worried when I heard about a local heat wave while we were gone, but fortunately a neighbor agreed to do some watering. Almost everything came through marvelously, and there are a lot of spring blooms (more on that later).

The garden, April 9, 2017

Wheelbarrow detail.

The Orange Wheelbarrow

Orange wheelbarrow.

So much depends upon an orange wheelbarrow, scarred from rough use, beside the green citrus.

Cunonia capensis

Cunonia capensis, Butterknife Tree

Stipule of Cononia capensis, Butterknife Tree.

Stipule of Cunonia capensis, Butterknife Tree.

Some leafstalks are marked by outgrowths at the base, usually on opposite sides. These were named stipules by Linnaeus, from the Latin word stipula, meaning “straw” or “stalk.” Not all plants have stipules, and among those that do, they vary greatly in appearance “and might appear as glands, scales, hairs, spines, or laminar (leaf-like) structures.” The remarkable, conspicuous stipules of Cunonia capensis, the African Red Alder, or Butterspoon or Butterknife Tree, are a focal point in the garden, almost always remarked upon by people who see them for the first time. The paired stipules are reddish in color and pressed together like cupped hands — or like butterspoons, I guess, whatever those are. (I say “butterknife” rather than “butterspoon.” I can see how the stipules are spoonlike, but I don’t apply my butter with a spoon, do you?)

An evergreen multistemmed perennial shrub or small tree from South Africa, this is one of my favorite specimen plants. I used to have several that I lost in our severe, years-long drought. The plant doesn’t need constant water, but it doesn’t like being dry, and I was careless (or all too responsible a California citizen). It also dislikes heat, and I’m now growing this one in a large container in part shade. While the tree can reach thirty feet in damp forests, it is seldom seen above fifteen feet in the open. Several sources report that it can be kept for many years in a container, and this has been my experience. It grows in zones 9–11 and prefers good drainage.

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Many ducks.

The morning commute

 

This brings back memories of my commute to San Francisco’s Civic Center, right down to the honking and passing along the shoulder. The traffic here is just moving a bit faster.

At this South African vineyard, a thousand Indian Runner Ducks keep the vines free of snails. The ducks are probably more enthusiastic workers than most of my fellow commuters. But then, they get paid in snails.

I guess all our garden needs now is a few hundred ducks.

Crabapple blossoms.

The prettiest fruiting tree blossoms

Crabapple blossoms, March 2017.

Crabapple blossoms, March 2017.

Crabapple, hands down.

Mugwort.

Artemisia douglasiana, Mugwort

Artemisia douglasiana, Mugwort.

Artemisia douglasiana, Mugwort.

This California native mugwort, here growing in a container, is happy after this year’s wet winter. I acquired a couple of specimens last summer, and they looked pretty rangy during those dry months. Like many native plants, mugwort is pretty resilient, tolerating shade and aridity up to a point, but in nature it favors moist locations.

It’s an underappreciated perennial plant for the garden. While top leaves are whole, lower leaves are lobed in a sharply jagged cleft pattern. The evenly-spaced leaves are dark green above and silvery (and a little wooly) below. The plant is aromatic, especially when the leaves are crushed.  It attracts butterflies and birds, and is said to be deer resistant. Stems grow erect from runners (which are not too difficult to control); some sources say they get to six feet, but I have never seem this plant above about three feet. Flowers (summer to fall) are insignificant.

Artemsias are in the Asteraceae (sunflower) family. Artemisia douglasiana is sometimes classed as Artemesia vulgaris var. douglasiana, but it is much more bitter and stronger flavored than the European mugwort (Artemesia vulgaris) referenced in many herbals. (There is also a Korean variety, which is closer to the European than to this native California mugwort.)

Also known as Dream Plant, the leaves of mugwort contain some of the same substances (notably thujone and cineole) as those of another Atemisia, wormwood (Artemisia absinthium). When smoked or drunk as a tea, they are said to produce vivid dreams, and to ward off the spirits of the dead. Native Californians sometimes wore mugwort necklaces for protection against such spirits. In the European tradition it was held that pillows stuffed with mugwort could reveal one’s future in dreams. One herbalist calls mugwort “ the star of any dream pillow.” A reference more to my taste is  “The Natural History of Orange County, California and Nearby Places,” which cites several print sources.

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Euphorbia myrsinites.

Euphorbia myrsinites, Donkeytail Spurge

Euphorbia mysrinites, Donkeytail Spurge.

New growth on Euphorbia myrsinites, Donkeytail Spurge.

Lots of new growth on the Donkeytail Spurge (Euphorbia myrsinites) this mid-March. The new growth is bright green; older leaves are blue-gray. Also called Myrtle Spurge because the Latin word myrsinites alludes to myrtle (Myrtus communis), which the plant was thought to resemble, this is a succulent spurge native to Southern Europe and West Asia. It is a low-growing (to about six inches) evergreen perennial. The “tails” grow to about one to one and a half feet long, spreading radially. The bright new growth resembling flowers is actually a specialized leaf called a bract.

Euphorbia mysrinites, Donkeytail Spurge.

Euphorbia myrsinites, Donkeytail Spurge, trailing over a container.

In some respects this spurge can be nasty. It projects seeds quite a distance and can overrun other plants. It is illegal to grow in Colorado, where it is classed as a noxious weed because of its invasive habit, though San Marcos Growers say this is not a problem in Mediterranean climates like ours (I would not recommend it in inland climes, except with caution and vigilance). In addition, like many spurges, it produces a sap that can cause fairly serious skin irritation in some people (and other animals); children are especially susceptible. You don’t want to get the sap in your eyes, that’s for sure. Finally, it is alleopathic, meaning it produces a substance that can prevent other plants from growing nearby. For these reasons I grow mine in containers and use gloves when repotting.

Despite all this, I am fond of this plant, as I am of most spurges (for an opposing take, check out the spurge haters at Dave’s Garden). Annie’s Annuals describes it as “an easy, tough, tidy groundcover that lends marvelous texture to rock gardens and is great trailing over rock walls.” I also have several Honey Spurges (Euphorbia mellifera). Both plants have not only interesting forms but also an almost electric brightness. You feel like this plant knows something. I just don’t know what.

 

Flipped-out spider web.

One weird web

Flipped-out spider web.

Flipped-out spider web.

Did the spider that wove this strange web outside one of my dining room windows get into somebody’s stash?

 

unknown weed

What’s this weed?

unknown weed

It’s a new one this year. Kind of pretty, but it sends out long tendrils that choke out everything.

Rain rain rain!

Detail of Kitazawa Seed Co. catalogue cover photo.

Browsing the Seed Catalogues: Kitazawa Seed Co.

Kitazawa catalogue cover.

Kitazawa catalogue cover.

Kitazawa, now based in Oakland, offers a two-color (green and black) catalogue printed on yellow paper and illustrated with line drawings. 2017 marks the company’s 100th anniversary. It was founded by Gijiu Kitazawa, an apprentice to a Japanese seed company who immigrated to the U.S. and settled in San Jose, where he sold seeds out of a downtown store.

Kitazawa seed catalogue contents page.

Kitazawa seed catalogue contents page.

During the war the Kitazawa family was forcibly interred into relocation camps, and the business had to be abandoned. Because of the internments, many Japanese-American farmers lost their farms, so after the war Kitazawa, having lost its local market, began a mail-order business.

Kitazawa catalogue spread.

Kitazawa catalogue spread.

The company features a range of Asian vegetables, not limited to Japanese. I would say that they have the most extensive selection of Asian vegetable seeds of any of the vendors I received catalogues from. Their descriptions are concise but informative.

Kitazawa special packages.

Kitazawa special packages.

Besides individual seed packets, priced at $3.69, the company offers packages of several seeds, called “Chef Specialty Gardens,” at a reduced price. I ordered the Stir Fry Garden mix.

Kitazawa seed packets.

Kitazawa seed packets.

I also ordered several other seeds from Kitazawa this year, and the company responded instantly: As I recall, the well-packaged seeds were in my mailbox the very next day! I was astonished.

A Kitazawa recipe.

A Kitazawa recipe.

In keeping with the family-oriented spirit of the company, their catalogue includes some recipes using the vegetables.

Orders can be made by phone, fax, mail, or via a secure web page: order info is here. This is one of my favorite seed vendors. Highly recommended.

The garden, March 4, 2017.

The Garden, March 2017

The garden, March 4, 2017.

The garden, March 4, 2017.

After this extraordinarily wet winter, we had to remove some trees from our hillside lot. This gives us more of a view of the valley as well as more sun to the garden. It’s all good.

Speaking of the garden (which once was a swimming pool), looking at this photo I see some work that needs to be done. But things are certainly very green, for here.

Wayside Gardens, South Carolina, 8 x 10.5 in., 104 pp.

Browsing the Seed Catalogues: Overview

It’s a truth universally acknowledged that one of the delights of gardening is browsing seed and plant catalogues. I have a handful of vendors I usually buy from, but this year I decided to do a fairly comprehensive survey of vendors and their catalogues. I know it’s late in the season for this, but I think there is still value in comparing the catalogues, if only for preparing for the fall batch (though I still have some spring ordering to do). In subsequent posts I’ll discuss many in detail. For now, here’s a gallery of the covers, together with the location of the vendor, the trim size of the catalogue, and its length. Stay tuned for more (list of vendors below the gallery).

The catalogues:

  • Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds, Missouri, 9 x 10.75 in., 148 pp.
  • Bluestone Perennials, Ohio, 8 x 10 in., 92 pp.
  • Botanical Interests, Colorado, 8.5 x 10.75 in., 72 pp.
  • Bountiful Gardens, California, 8.25 x 10.25 in., 72 pp.
  • Grow Organic: Fruit Trees, California, 7.75 x 10 in., 68 pp.
  • Grow Organic: Gardening Essentials, California, 7.75 x 10 in., 68 pp.
  • Grow Organic: Quality Tools, California, 7.75 x 10 in., 68 pp.
  • Grow Organic: Seeds, California, 7.75 x 10 in., 68 pp.
  • Growers Supply, Connecticut, 7.75 x 10 in., 138 pp.
  • Gurney’s, Indiana, 9.25 x 13 in., 68 pp.
  • Harris Seeds: Garden Trends, New York, 7.25 x 10.25, 124 pp.
  • J. L. Hudson, Seedsman, California, 5.5 x 8.5 in., 96 pp.
  • Johnny’s Selected Seeds, Maine, 7.75 x 10.25 in., 244 pp.
  • Kitazawa Seed Co., California, 8.5 x 11 in., 48 pp.
  • Park Seed, South Carolina, 8 x 10 in., 148 pp.
  • Pepper Joe’s, Maryland, 5.5 x 8.5 in., 34 pp.
  • Pinetree, Maine, 8 x 10 in., 132 pages
  • Raintree Nursery, Washington, 8.5 x 10.75 in., 96 pp.
  • Richters, Ontario, 6 x 9.5 in., 96 pp.
  • Seed Savers Exchange, Iowa, 8.5 x 10.25 in., 116 pp.
  • Seeds from Italy, Kansas, 5.5 x 8.5 in., 64 pp.
  • Seeds of Change, Minnesota, 7.75 x 10 in., 68 pp.
  • Select Seeds, Connecticut, 8 x 10 in., 68 pp.
  • Territorial Seeds Co., Oregon, 7.25 x 10.25 in., 164 pp.
  • Wayside Gardens, South Carolina, 8 x 10.5 in., 104 pp.
  • White Flower Farm, Connecticut, 8 x 10 in., 140 pp.

Trim size is approximate (the edges of some catalogues are rather imprecisely  trimmed). Some catalogues have self covers and others have a cover stock around the inside pages. Most number the cover as page 1, but some omit the covers from the page counts. (One, Pinetree, actually numbers the inside front cover as 1, so that their versos are odd and their rectos are even. That’s dumb, and someone should have a word with them.) I have tallied up the pages as best I can, including the cover pages in the count.

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